Biotech Research/Stem Cell Medicine Blogs

Written by liz ernst




Global Stem Cells Group: Written by liz ernst for Global Stem Cells Group

Gordie Howe's stem cells treatments Support a Growing Appeal for

In October, 2014, legendary hockey player Gordie Howe, then 86, was on death’s door after suffering a debilitating acute hemorrhagic, left thalamus stroke. Upon returning home from the hospital, Howe needed someone to lift him from his bed to a wheelchair and back. He couldn’t remember the names of his four children, Marty, Mark, Cathy, and Murray, and his condition continued to grow worse in subsequent weeks. This article can also be viewed on the Global Stem Cells Group website: http://www.stemcellsgroup.com/gordie-howes-stem-cell-treatments-support-growing-appeal-therapies-among-athletes-baby-boomers/
LinkedIn: Written by Liz Ernst for Global Stem Cells Group

(Almost) everything you wanted to know about stem cells

Stem cells have captured the interest of biology nerds, armchair practitioners and everyday individuals for years. Where exactly do they come from and how do they work? When can I have my torn rotary cuff/bum knee /arthritis /(fill in the blank) treated with stem cells? At Global Stem Cells Group, we are making stem cell treatments for a variety of medical conditions available in the physician’s office and out-patient treatment clinics worldwide, and we’re aiming to make them readily available in the U.S. soon, so hang tight.
LinkedIn: Written by Liz Ernst for Global Stem Cells Group

Stem Cell-stimulating Fillings Help Regenerate Teeth Damaged by Decay, Disease

Researchers from Harvard University and the University of Nottingham have developed a new filling that stimulates stem cells in dental pulp to regenerate and even regrow teeth damaged by disease and decay. According to Newsweek Magazine, the discovery earned a prize from the Royal Society of Chemistry after judges described it as a “new paradigm for dental treatments.” The treatment is believed to potentially eliminate the need for root canals.
Global Stem Cells Group: Written by liz ernst for Global Stem Cells Group

Mending a broken heart with adult stem cells

Researchers are learning about mending a broken heart–that is, how to generate healthy heart muscle stem cells in the laboratory and then transplant those cells into patients with chronic heart disease. Preliminary research in mice and other animals indicates that bone marrow stromal cells, transplanted into a damaged heart, can have beneficial effects. Whether these cells can generate heart muscle cells or stimulate the growth of new blood vessels that repopulate the heart tissue, or help through some other mechanism is actively under investigation.
Global Stem Cells Group: Written by liz ernst for Global Stem Cells Group

Brain cells in aging patients: stem cell therapies

The human brain, as it turns out, is far more malleable than we once thought. Even adult brains. But they are subject to age-related diseases and disorders, such as dementia and diminished cognitive function. There is hope that medical science may be able to replace brain cells and restore memory in aging patients thanks to new discoveries in neural stem cell techniques. Researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine recently published new findings in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine that suggests a new technique for preparing donor neural stem cells and grafting them into an aged brain can regenerate tissue that has succumbed to structural, chemical, and functional changes, as well as a host of neurocognitive changes that can be attributed to aging.
LinkedIn: Written by Liz Ernst for Global Stem Cells Group

Stem Cell Research Goes Crimson: International Leader in Stem Cell Research Named New Dean of Harvard Medical School

The internationally recognized leader in stem cell science and cancer biology and a longtime member of the Harvard Medical School (HMS) faculty whose work includes the fields of basic science and clinical medicine, Daley was the driving force behind creating international guidelines around first, human embryonic stem cell research, and then the clinical application of stem cells, according to Nancy Witty, CEO of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR).
Global Stem Cells Group: Written by liz ernst for Global Stem Cells Group

The different types of stem cells and their current uses

Stem cells offer great potential for use in clinical applications thanks to their ability to specialize into different cell types and to renew themselves. Although some of them have limitations, stem cells are still an amazing resource for the medical world, as no other cell inside the human body has the ability to generate new cell types with a more specific function that the source. Stem cells can be considered the body’s raw building blocks, as all the other cells with specialized functions result from stem cells that divide and give birth to daughter cells. These cells, at their turn, divide or differentiate and become specialized, giving birth to muscle, bone, blood, brain or other specific cell types.
Global Stem Cells Group

Stem Cell Researchers Discover Stem Cells That Might Repair Skull, Face Bones

Scientists may be one step closer to a breakthrough that uses stem cells to replace damaged skull and facial bones in patients who experience a head trauma or undergo cancer surgery requiring repair and reconstructive surgery. Researchers have discovered and isolated stem cells capable of repairing these bones in mice. The research, led by Takamitsu Maruyama and the research team at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, N.Y., could also help patients born with a skull deformity known as craniosynostosis, which can lead to developmental delays and pressure on the brain.
Global Stem Cells Group: Written by liz ernst for Global Stem Cells Group

Scientists Develop 3-D “Mini-retinas” –New Hope for Restoring Sight in Patients with Retinal Degeneration

Medical breakthroughs using stem cells are aimed at all parts of the body bones, kidneys, joints, spines–and now, sight. A German study in March in Stem Cell Reports, reports that scientists have created an efficient way of developing 3D retina organoids leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies.
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Health & Medical Industry / Stem Cell Blogs

written by liz ernst